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Transmisogyny at Broadway's Pagliacci Pizza Resturant

poutypuffgirl:

TW: transmisogyny, transmisogyny at the hands of managers/bosses/authority figures

image

Dylan, a young woman working at Pagliacci’s Pizza was wrongfully fired this week. She writes her account of the events that led to her unemployment in a facebook status, which she allowed me to post here:

red-lipstick:

Lily Padula (USA) - 1: Lighting The Way, Crystal Cave GIF  2,3,4: Selected Images From Aliens Exist Zine  5: Burning Bridges, Personal work  6: Pushing Up Daisies, Personal work

(Source: lilypadula.com)

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Neon Artist Chris Bracey

Chris Bracey got his start in the art world making neon signs for sex shops in Soho before being chosen to work on iconic films like Eyes Wide Shut and Batman.

Read More

(via bkblossom)

Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …

bisexual activist and queer theory blogger Patrick RichardsFink (via fliponymous)

this is an interesting point, although mathematically inaccurate: assuming the women:men, 0.78:1 ratio is correct, men make $1.28 for every woman’s $1

(via haveyouevercriedwolf)

White people are still the ~standard so that’s not so revolutionary.

(via dykeprivilege)

A white man makes $1.34 for every dollar that a black man makes

A white man makes $1.52 for every dollar that a latino man makes

A white man makes $1.24 for every dollar that a white woman makes

A white man makes $1.44 for every dollar that a black woman makes

A white man makes $1.67 for every dollar that a latina woman makes

That’s some bullshit right there.

(via little-bulldozer)

(via estefania-rosario)

Lykke Li – Unrequited Love

fat-babe-life:

keepitsaucy:

Unrequited Love | Lykke Li

wow lykke li wrote a song about my life

(via bkblossom)

I love the person I’ve become, because I fought to become her.
– Kaci Diane (via xokrista)

(Source: kacidiane, via decolonizeyourmind)

Why the term is "transgender" and not "transgendered"

beckdrop:

Here is some yellow paper.

image

We say it is yellow because that’s what color it is.

Simple enough, let’s move on.

Here is some white paper.

image

We say it is white because that’s what color it is.

Now, imagine some stuff happens to the white paper - something spills on it, it’s left in the…

frida y chavela

frida y chavela

I’m an English major. It is a language of conquest.

What does it say that I’m mastering the same language that was used to make my mother feel inferior? Growing up, I had a white friend who used to laugh whenever my mother spoke English, amused by the way she rolled her r’s. My sister and I tease Mami about her accent too, but it’s different when we do it, or is it? The echoes of colonization linger in my voice. The weapons of the death squads that pushed my mother out of El Salvador were U.S.-funded. When Nixon promised, “We’re going to smash him!” it was said in his native tongue, and when the Chilean president he smashed used his last words to promise, “Long live Chile!” it was said in his. And when my family told me the story of my grandfather’s arrest by the dictatorship that followed, my grandfather stayed silent, and meeting his eyes, I cried, understanding that there were no words big enough for loss.

English is a language of conquest. I benefit from its richness, but I’m not exempt from its limitations. I am ‘that girl’ in your English classes, the one who is tired of talking about dead white dudes. But I’m still complicit with the system, reading nineteenth-century British literature to graduate.

Diversity in my high school and college English literature courses is too often reduced to a month, week, or day where the author of the book is seen as the narrator of the novel. The multiplicity of U.S. minority voices is palatably packaged into a singular representation for our consumption. I read Junot Díaz and now I understand not only the Dominican-American experience, but what it means to be Latina/o in America. Jhumpa Lahiri inspired me to study abroad in India. Sherman Alexie calls himself an Indian, so now it’s ok for me to call all Indians that, too. We will read Toni Morrison’s Beloved to understand the horrors of slavery, but we won’t watch her takedowns on white supremacy.

Even the English courses that analyze race and diasporas in meaningful ways are still limited by the time constraints of the semester. Reading Shakespeare is required, but reading Paolo Javier and Mónica de la Torre is extra credit. My Experimental Minority Writing class is cross-listed at the most difficult level, as a 400-level course in the Africana Studies, Latina/o Studies, and American Studies departments, but in my English department, it is listed as a 300-level. I am reminded of Orwellian democracy: All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.

– Monica Torres, “Majoring In English,” The Feminist Wire 3/29/13 (via racialicious)

(via dreaminginspanish)

Letters to Ladies Who Speak Their Truths: Dear Warrior Queen

letterstoladies:

You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I love you. You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I love you. You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I love you. You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I love you. You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I love you. You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I…

Letters to Ladies Who Speak Their Truths: Dear Lady in the Limelight, Pt. II

letterstoladies:

You are in the Limelight because you were strong enough to put yourself there. I want you to know the power of your light…that my friends, and my sisters, and my sisters’ friends, we’re all amazed by you. I have been thinking about your light, your power, and how I wish I had been as brave as…

superqueerartsyblog:

✿ Walking talking queer encyclopedia with a healthy rose-cheeked smile! ✿

superqueerartsyblog:

✿ Walking talking queer encyclopedia with a healthy rose-cheeked smile! ✿

(via eliasericson)

cosmiacat:

Grimes l Zoal, Face Dancer

(Source: auroraes / juanobaboso, via neutralmilknhoney)

Transmisogyny at Broadway's Pagliacci Pizza Resturant

poutypuffgirl:

TW: transmisogyny, transmisogyny at the hands of managers/bosses/authority figures

image

Dylan, a young woman working at Pagliacci’s Pizza was wrongfully fired this week. She writes her account of the events that led to her unemployment in a facebook status, which she allowed me to post here:

red-lipstick:

Lily Padula (USA) - 1: Lighting The Way, Crystal Cave GIF  2,3,4: Selected Images From Aliens Exist Zine  5: Burning Bridges, Personal work  6: Pushing Up Daisies, Personal work

(Source: lilypadula.com)

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Neon Artist Chris Bracey

Chris Bracey got his start in the art world making neon signs for sex shops in Soho before being chosen to work on iconic films like Eyes Wide Shut and Batman.

Read More

(via bkblossom)

Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …

bisexual activist and queer theory blogger Patrick RichardsFink (via fliponymous)

this is an interesting point, although mathematically inaccurate: assuming the women:men, 0.78:1 ratio is correct, men make $1.28 for every woman’s $1

(via haveyouevercriedwolf)

White people are still the ~standard so that’s not so revolutionary.

(via dykeprivilege)

A white man makes $1.34 for every dollar that a black man makes

A white man makes $1.52 for every dollar that a latino man makes

A white man makes $1.24 for every dollar that a white woman makes

A white man makes $1.44 for every dollar that a black woman makes

A white man makes $1.67 for every dollar that a latina woman makes

That’s some bullshit right there.

(via little-bulldozer)

(via estefania-rosario)

I love the person I’ve become, because I fought to become her.
– Kaci Diane (via xokrista)

(Source: kacidiane, via decolonizeyourmind)

Why the term is "transgender" and not "transgendered"

beckdrop:

Here is some yellow paper.

image

We say it is yellow because that’s what color it is.

Simple enough, let’s move on.

Here is some white paper.

image

We say it is white because that’s what color it is.

Now, imagine some stuff happens to the white paper - something spills on it, it’s left in the…

frida y chavela

frida y chavela

(Source: postsecret.com)

I’m an English major. It is a language of conquest.

What does it say that I’m mastering the same language that was used to make my mother feel inferior? Growing up, I had a white friend who used to laugh whenever my mother spoke English, amused by the way she rolled her r’s. My sister and I tease Mami about her accent too, but it’s different when we do it, or is it? The echoes of colonization linger in my voice. The weapons of the death squads that pushed my mother out of El Salvador were U.S.-funded. When Nixon promised, “We’re going to smash him!” it was said in his native tongue, and when the Chilean president he smashed used his last words to promise, “Long live Chile!” it was said in his. And when my family told me the story of my grandfather’s arrest by the dictatorship that followed, my grandfather stayed silent, and meeting his eyes, I cried, understanding that there were no words big enough for loss.

English is a language of conquest. I benefit from its richness, but I’m not exempt from its limitations. I am ‘that girl’ in your English classes, the one who is tired of talking about dead white dudes. But I’m still complicit with the system, reading nineteenth-century British literature to graduate.

Diversity in my high school and college English literature courses is too often reduced to a month, week, or day where the author of the book is seen as the narrator of the novel. The multiplicity of U.S. minority voices is palatably packaged into a singular representation for our consumption. I read Junot Díaz and now I understand not only the Dominican-American experience, but what it means to be Latina/o in America. Jhumpa Lahiri inspired me to study abroad in India. Sherman Alexie calls himself an Indian, so now it’s ok for me to call all Indians that, too. We will read Toni Morrison’s Beloved to understand the horrors of slavery, but we won’t watch her takedowns on white supremacy.

Even the English courses that analyze race and diasporas in meaningful ways are still limited by the time constraints of the semester. Reading Shakespeare is required, but reading Paolo Javier and Mónica de la Torre is extra credit. My Experimental Minority Writing class is cross-listed at the most difficult level, as a 400-level course in the Africana Studies, Latina/o Studies, and American Studies departments, but in my English department, it is listed as a 300-level. I am reminded of Orwellian democracy: All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.

– Monica Torres, “Majoring In English,” The Feminist Wire 3/29/13 (via racialicious)

(via dreaminginspanish)

Letters to Ladies Who Speak Their Truths: Dear Warrior Queen

letterstoladies:

You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I love you. You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I love you. You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I love you. You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I love you. You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I love you. You’re not dumb, it wasn’t your fault, I…

Letters to Ladies Who Speak Their Truths: Dear Lady in the Limelight, Pt. II

letterstoladies:

You are in the Limelight because you were strong enough to put yourself there. I want you to know the power of your light…that my friends, and my sisters, and my sisters’ friends, we’re all amazed by you. I have been thinking about your light, your power, and how I wish I had been as brave as…

thelostsunprincess:

Decorative Vulva by Betty Dodson (1973)

thelostsunprincess:

Decorative Vulva by Betty Dodson (1973)

(Source: lipsredasroses)

superqueerartsyblog:

✿ Walking talking queer encyclopedia with a healthy rose-cheeked smile! ✿

superqueerartsyblog:

✿ Walking talking queer encyclopedia with a healthy rose-cheeked smile! ✿

(via eliasericson)

cosmiacat:

Grimes l Zoal, Face Dancer

(Source: auroraes / juanobaboso, via neutralmilknhoney)

"Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …"
Lykke Li – Unrequited Love

fat-babe-life:

keepitsaucy:

Unrequited Love | Lykke Li

wow lykke li wrote a song about my life

(via bkblossom)

"I love the person I’ve become, because I fought to become her."
"

I’m an English major. It is a language of conquest.

What does it say that I’m mastering the same language that was used to make my mother feel inferior? Growing up, I had a white friend who used to laugh whenever my mother spoke English, amused by the way she rolled her r’s. My sister and I tease Mami about her accent too, but it’s different when we do it, or is it? The echoes of colonization linger in my voice. The weapons of the death squads that pushed my mother out of El Salvador were U.S.-funded. When Nixon promised, “We’re going to smash him!” it was said in his native tongue, and when the Chilean president he smashed used his last words to promise, “Long live Chile!” it was said in his. And when my family told me the story of my grandfather’s arrest by the dictatorship that followed, my grandfather stayed silent, and meeting his eyes, I cried, understanding that there were no words big enough for loss.

English is a language of conquest. I benefit from its richness, but I’m not exempt from its limitations. I am ‘that girl’ in your English classes, the one who is tired of talking about dead white dudes. But I’m still complicit with the system, reading nineteenth-century British literature to graduate.

Diversity in my high school and college English literature courses is too often reduced to a month, week, or day where the author of the book is seen as the narrator of the novel. The multiplicity of U.S. minority voices is palatably packaged into a singular representation for our consumption. I read Junot Díaz and now I understand not only the Dominican-American experience, but what it means to be Latina/o in America. Jhumpa Lahiri inspired me to study abroad in India. Sherman Alexie calls himself an Indian, so now it’s ok for me to call all Indians that, too. We will read Toni Morrison’s Beloved to understand the horrors of slavery, but we won’t watch her takedowns on white supremacy.

Even the English courses that analyze race and diasporas in meaningful ways are still limited by the time constraints of the semester. Reading Shakespeare is required, but reading Paolo Javier and Mónica de la Torre is extra credit. My Experimental Minority Writing class is cross-listed at the most difficult level, as a 400-level course in the Africana Studies, Latina/o Studies, and American Studies departments, but in my English department, it is listed as a 300-level. I am reminded of Orwellian democracy: All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.

"

About:

Il est preferable d'aider les gens que les nains de jardin.

a crafty bastard & a babbling brook.

shout outs to multi-cultural, womyn-positive, queer-positive, class-conscious, anti-militaristic art & ideas that promote a sustainable world and community.